Soft Or Hard Dog Food

Sometimes dog owners are faced with a dilemma regarding what type pf dog food to provide their dogs. Dogs themselves tend to prefer the moist, canned types of food. They are more aromatic and naturally tempting to the dog’s palate than the dry kibble that comes in a bag. A dog’s dental health, however, relies on the dog being able to chew hard and crunchy items and dry kibble foods serve this purpose well. What’s an owner to do?

Some owners make a two pronged approach when selecting dog food for their furry friends. They will mix a portion of dry food with canned, effectively giving their dog the “best of both worlds.” If you are feeding canned food to your dog, you’ll definitely want to supplement it in some way with something that the dog can chew and crunch. Chew toys and dog biscuits or treats can help to serve this purpose.

Remember that a dog’s health depends greatly on the nutritional value of its food. A dog is only as healthy as the food that it eats, in many respects. The food you buy for your dog should meet its nutritional needs as best as possible, whether it is dry or moist. Unfortunately when it comes to dog food you get what you pay for. Store brands and generics tend to be made with cheaper ingredients and lots of fillers. They’ll feed your dog, but they may not be the best choices for it. The more expensive brands like Science Diet and Eukanuba which advertise that they are “specially formulated” really, to a certain extent, are. They will have higher quality ingredients and are better suited to meet your dog’s needs.

Truly, as long as you are providing a good method for your dog to work out its choppers on a regular basis, it doesn’t matter whether you’re using dry food or moist. During regular veterinary checkups your vet will examine the dog’s teeth and will warn you if there’s any issue that needs to be corrected by providing a different type of food or some dietary supplement.

The reason that dogs need to be able to chew on hard materials is twofold. It strengthens their teeth and works out the muscles of their jaw, keeping the teeth strong and the jaws powerful. It also provides a form of dental care. Owners should brush their dogs’ teeth at least twice a week. If this is not possible, however, crunchy foods like kibble and biscuits act as a sort of natural toothbrush for the dog, loosening plaque and tartar and cleaning the teeth.

Choosing the right food for your dog is important, both for the pooch’s nutritional needs and its good dental health. If you prefer to provide your dog the tastier soft, moist foods that come in a can that’s fine, just make sure you’re also providing something for Rover to really sink his teeth into.

 

Coconut Oil to support a healthy cat

Life & Soul Magazine

Coconut oil has many uses and its benefits stretch to include everyone in your household including your furry friends.

Coconut oil can have many benefits for cats, including the ability to clear up skin conditions, soothe allergies, improve immune health, reduce inflammation throughout the body, and improve digestive issues.

When using coconut oil for your cat’s health use extra virgin coconut oil or cold pressed coconut oil. Try introducing it into their diet by adding it to your fingertip and seeing how your cat responds to it. If they do not like the taste, you can try adding it to their food instead.

For a kitten, give a trace amount of coconut oil daily. And for an adult cat, no more than 1/2 teaspoon is recommended.

Here are a few ways in which coconut oil can support your cat’s health:

Supports Nutrition
Coconut oil is a saturated fat, but it also…

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Strategies To Train Your Puppy To Accept The Collar And Lead

Walking on a collar and lead is an important skill that every dog must learn. Even the best trained dog should never be taken outside the home or yard without a sturdy collar and leash. Even if your dog is trained perfectly to go off lead, accidents and distractions do happen, and a collar, with proper identification attached, is the best way to be sure you will get your beloved companion back.

Of course before you can teach your new puppy to accept a leash, he or she must first learn to accept wearing a collar. The first step is to choose a collar that fits the dog properly. It is important to measure the puppy’s neck, and to choose a collar size accordingly.

After the collar has been put on the puppy, simply let him or her get used to it. It is not unusual for a puppy to try to pull on the collar, whine, roll or squirm when first introduced to a collar.

The best strategy is to simply ignore the puppy and let him or her get used to the collar. It is a mistake to either punish the dog for playing with the collar or to encourage the behavior. Distracting the puppy often helps, and playing with a favorite toy, or eating some favorite treats, can help the puppy quickly forget that he or she is wearing this strange piece of equipment.

After the dog has learned to accept the collar, try adding the leash. Hook the leash to the collar and simply sit and watch the puppy. Obviously, this should only be done either in the house or in a confined outdoor area. The puppy should be allowed to drag the leash around on its own, but of course the owner should keep a close eye on the puppy to ensure that the leash does not become snagged or hung up on anything.

At first, the leash should only be left on for a few minutes at a time. It is a good idea to attach the leash at mealtimes, playtime and other positive times in the life of the puppy.

That way the puppy will begin to associate the leash with good things and look forward to it. If the puppy shows a high degree of fear of the leash, it is a good idea to place it next to the food bowl for awhile to let him get used to it slowly. Eventually, he will come to understand that the leash is nothing to be afraid of.

After the puppy is comfortable with walking around the house wearing the leash, it is time for you to pick up the end of the leash for a few minutes. You should not try to walk the puppy on the leash; simply hold the end of the leash and follow the puppy around as he or she walks around. You should try to avoid situations where the leash becomes taut, and any pulling or straining on the leash should be avoided. It is fine for the puppy to sit down. Try a few games with the collar and lead.

For instance, back up and encourage the puppy to walk toward you. Don’t drag the puppy forward, simply encourage him to come to you. If he does, praise him profusely and reward him with a food treat or toy. You should always strive to make all the time spent on the leash as pleasant as possible.

It is important to give the puppy plenty of practice in getting used to walking on the leash in the home. It is best to do plenty of work in the home, since it is a safe environment with few distractions. After the puppy is comfortable walking indoors on a leash, it is time to start going outside, beginning of course in a small, enclosed area like a fenced yard.

After the puppy has mastered walking calmly outdoors on a leash, it is time to visit some places where there are more distractions. You may want to start with a place like a neighbor’s yard. Walking your new puppy around the neighborhood is a good way to introduce your neighbors to the new puppy, while giving the puppy valuable experience in avoiding distractions and focusing on his leash training.

Puppies sometimes develop bad habits with their leashes, such as biting or chewing on the leash. To discourage this type of behavior, try applying a little bit of bitter apple, Tabasco sauce or similar substance (just make sure the substance you use is not toxic to dogs). This strategy usually convinces puppies that chewing the leash is a bad idea.

Dog House Building

Dog owners have to consider several factors when buying or building a house for their pets. As a true member of your own family, providing your pet with the best home possible is of the utmost importance.

Size

A German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Rottweiler and other large dogs should have large houses, while the Chihuahua and smaller breeds will need smaller houses. The door of the house does not need to be based on the height of the dog from the ground to the top of its head, or even taller, as it will lower its head to be able to enter the house. The width of the door should be just enough to accommodate the dog. These height and width measurements can be adjusted if there is a physical requirement to do so. The house should also be large enough for the dog to stand at full height inside, move around and lie down. Owners should remember that a larger-than-needed home will compromise the dog’s retention of body heat during the winter or colder months.

Weather Conditions

Some dog houses are made with hinged roofs, a feature that allows owners to raise the roof during hot and humid weather. This flexibility provides adequate air flow to flush out warm air and allow fresh or cool air to enter. In some cases, these roofs can also be lowered, creating a smaller space for the dog and enhancing its ability to retain heat during rainy or cold weather. Asphalt shingles should be used only if there is an adequate insulation barrier separating the roof from the main area of the house. Many house models also come with slanted roofs, ensuring that water drains away during rainy days. Owners should avoid building or buying houses with barn-type or peak-style roofs, as these would attract hornets, wasps and other insects and prevent heat retention. Another option is wind walls, which can be inserted into the dog house to break the wind and keep the house warmer. The house should also be a reasonable distance off the ground to keep it dry. For owners with bigger budgets, some house manufacturers offer provisions for heaters and air-conditioners. These climate control systems help ensure comfort for the dog regardless of weather conditions.

Doors

The front door of the dog house should be located to one side instead of in the middle. This will prevent the dog from being directly exposed to extreme weather conditions and other harsh environmental elements. Some models are designed with removable doors, or with no doors at all. Using a door will help keep the dog house warmer during cold months. An awning type cover can also be used over the opening for added shade and protection.

Easy To Clean And Maintain

– Removable or adjustable roofs

– Doors, partitions

– Wind walls

– Flexibility in cleaning

– Restrict use of paint, stains, or water sealers for the outside of the house

Use Wood

Plastic and metal houses are not a good idea, as they are either too hot during summertime or too cold during the winter. Some market experts say that houses made from natural western red cedar wood offer the best insulation for dogs during winter while making them cooler during summer. Red cedar wood oils are also natural repellants of ticks, fleas and termites. Houses made from this material are also maintenance-free on the outside, although owners have a choice of finishing it to complement their property. Sprinkling red cedar wood chips or shavings in the bedding also helps prevent infestation. Owners should also remember that wooden roofs help cut down heat build-up from the sun while helping to maintain reasonable heat retention levels.

Keep The Dog House Elevated

For legless houses, the owner must remember that having it directly on the ground increases the likelihood that the pet would be exposed to cold and wet weather. This also raises the possibility of infestation from flea eggs that hatch in the soil. The owner can use bricks, rocks or stones arranged in a level and stable manner to elevate the house. The elevation will allow air to flow beneath the house and prevent moisture from forming at the bottom.

 

Choosing The Right Dog Breed

Were you aware that there are literally hundreds of distinct dog breeds? When you decide to get a dog, choosing the right dog breed for you and your family is essential. With so many different dog breeds available, this can become a very daunting task. Luckily, there are ways in which you can narrow down your options somewhat, making the whole thing a lot easier.

First and foremost you should be considering one major factor….. How much space do you have? If you live in an apartment there is little point in getting a large dog that takes up a lot of room and may also need a lot of exercising. For living areas with limited space, consider the Toy group of dogs such as the Terrier Group or Miniature Pinscher. Also the cost of keeping your dog should be evaluated. Very large dogs may eat significant amounts of food whereas smaller dogs will eat very little in comparison. Try doing a rough calculation of cost for several different dog breeds over a twelve month period. Take into consideration food and regular visits to the vet for inoculation, worming etc. You will see that larger dogs are very often much more expensive to keep.

If you have children, you may want to consider what dog breed would suit them. Children can be quite heavy handed with pets sometimes; getting a Chihuahua for example may not be such a good idea as they are delicate animals. Similarly, having a Great Dane or Saint Bernard marauding around the house could be dangerous for a child. The age and number of children you have should definitely be considered as this will affect what type of dog would best suit your circumstances.

Another major point to consider is how much exercise you can offer your dog. If you have a reasonable sized yard, fencing it off will provide a good space for your dog to exercise itself. If you live in an apartment, consider getting a dog that requires very little exercise. An excitable Border collie would be a poor choice for an apartment life. Also, how much exercise can YOU put up with? There is no point getting a dog that requires lots of exercise such as a Hunting or Sporting dog breed if you cannot keep up the exercise regime. Try and get a dog that suits your lifestyle.

Grooming you dog is something to think about. If you do not have a lot of spare time in your life try to avoid dog breeds like the Standard Poodle which will need very regular grooming sessions. The short haired Terriers or Whippets make a good choice for somebody who has little time to sit and groom for hours at a time. Conversely if you have a lot of free time, regular grooming sessions with your dog will provide you both with a lot of quality time that you will both enjoy.

When choosing your dog, take a look at the bigger picture. Try to resist the temptation to go for the cutest, cuddliest, adorable dog you can find. Consider your lifestyle, your home, your family and try to find a dog breed that fits best with your life. After all, your new dog will be sharing your life with you for many years to come so making sure that you are both happy is an important thing to consider.

Dog Training

You’re proud of the new member of your family, that furry four-legged creature that is full of unconditional love and that will be with you for years to come. All too often, though, a new puppy or dog can wreak havoc on your home, yard, and neighborly relationships. For the sake of a happy home life and a contented puppy, dog training is a necessity. The right approach, combined with professional dog obedience training, will ensure that your newest family member will fit right in. Here are four secrets that the pros use for success.

1. Who’s the Top Dog?

By nature, dogs travel in packs, with the alpha dog as the leader of the pack. There can only be one alpha dog per pack; otherwise, chaos would ensue and the safety of the pack would be in peril. Your dog needs to understand that you are the alpha dog of the pack. You communicate that to your dog by exerting your leadership, such as taking him for a walk when you come home from work or by successfully completing a dog obedience training course together. You also exert your alpha dog status by controlling your dog’s food. When he knows that you feed him twice a day, it reinforces your position as top dog.

2. Consistency is Key

Virtually every dog trainer will tell you that humans are generally at fault when dogs don’t successfully learn commands. That’s because dogs see the world in black and white, whereas humans see the world in shades of gray. For humans, “Come” and “C’mon” mean the same thing; a dog, on the other hand, may understand “Come” but is clueless as to what his owner wants when he says, “C’mon.” Whenever you want to modify your dog’s behavior or teach it a command, use a consistent vocabulary and tone.

3. Mutual Respect Leads to Obedience

A happy and healthy human-canine relationship is based on mutual respect. Your dog respects your position as the alpha of the pack and you respect his needs. Contrary to what you may read, respect and obedience do not grow out of a package of doggie treats, nor do they grow out of fear. Excessive rewards and excessive sternness will lead to erratic behavior, while appropriate praise and correction will lead to respect.

4. Timing is Everything

Timing comes into play in various aspects of dog training. The adage, “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” isn’t entirely correct, but it is much easier to train a puppy than it is an older dog. Some people make the mistake of engaging their dogs in long, drawn-out training sessions. Like young children, the attention spans of dogs are relatively short, and fun 15-minute lessons are more likely to bring results than hour-long drills. Timing is also key when establishing your alpha role. For example, the alpha dog eats first, so you should feed your dog after you’ve finished with your meal.

Dog training is a necessity, but it doesn’t have to be a chore. Regardless of the location of your dog training – Chicago, San Francisco, or Miami – you should find a dog trainer that both you and your dog enjoy, and work with her or him to make your new family member feel right at home.

Traveling With Your Pet

Many people most of the time travel. It’s not a great think but when you are traveling with your pet that time you need to concentrate more on your pet which may disturb you to enjoy your vacation.

If your pet is very young or old, or is ill, pregnant, injured recovering form surgery then avoid to take them with you as is such time they need more concentration and if you really wish to carry your pet in your vacation then consult with pet sitter rather than take a chance on injuring your pet by taking it with you. If you are in doubt, ask your veterinarian. If your pet has not traveled before, try a short overnight or weekend trip first.

Before you leave inform your veterinarian where you will be traveling to, for how long, as well as whether your pet will be traveling by air or car. Ask about any flea, heartworm, or tick risks for areas you will be traveling to. If your pet becomes carsick or restless when traveling, ask veterinarian about appropriate medications or treatments.

Many times while traveling it happen we get separated from our pet and they get panic so try to avoid such type of situation for traveling safely with your pet. Your pet should wear a safety collar all the time with a tag showing proof of rabies vaccination and your name address, phone number in case your pet becomes separated from you.

To take care of your pet when away from home try to keep fresh water available and don think of changing their die all of a sudden. Make sure your pet is accustomed to the crate before you begin your trip.